Welcome to Eastbourne Sceptics in the Pub.

At Sceptics in the Pub local and national experts in their field present and then discuss a topic in a friendly and relaxed environment...a pub!

The common theme for all the talks is scepticism (or skepticism if you prefer), which in broad terms means bringing a scientific, evidence based approach to examine common beliefs and misconceptions. You can find out more about skeptics here.

Tickets

We charge £3.00 for tickets to cover running costs and speakers travel expenses. Tickets go on sale online (with an additional booking fee) a few weeks before the next event  or may be purchased at the door on the night.

We hope you will come and have a drink with us.

Professor David Goulson

When?
Wednesday, December 17 2014 at 8:00PM

Download iCalendar file
(e.g. import to Outlook or Google Calendar)

Where?

1 Grange Road
Eastbourne
BN21 4EU

Who?
Professor David Goulson

What's the talk about?

Dave Goulson will talk about modern farming, pesticides, and the growing but highly controversial evidence that certain insecticides may be contributing substantially to the ongoing decline of bees, butterflies, birds and more. Expect talk of bees, intrigue, conspiracies, and political corruption.

PARTY:
After the talk and Q and A we will be laying on some wine and mince pies. In keeping with the bee theme we hope to get some mead in. Why not stay a little and have a chat with fellow sceptics.

About the speaker:
Professor Dave Goulson was brought up in rural Shropshire, where he developed an early obsession with wildlife. He received his bachelor’s degree in biology from Oxford University, followed by a doctorate on butterfly ecology at Oxford Brookes University. Subsequently, he lectured in biology for 11 years at the University of Southampton, and it was here that he began to study bumblebees in earnest. He subsequently moved to Stirling University in 2006, and then to Sussex in 2013. He has published more than 200 scientific articles on the ecology and conservation of bumblebees and other insects. He is the author of Bumblebees; Their Behaviour, Ecology and Conservation, published in 2010 by Oxford University Press, and of the Sunday Times bestseller A Sting in the Tale, a popular science book about bumble bees, published in 2013 by Jonathan Cape, and now translated into German, Dutch and Danish. This was followed by A Buzz in the Meadow in 2014. Goulson founded the Bumblebee Conservation Trust in 2006, a charity which has grown to 8,000 members. He was the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council’s Social Innovator of the Year in 2010, was given the Zoological Society of London's Marsh Award for Conservation Biology in 2013, and was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh in 2013.

Part of the Brighton Science Festival

Nessa Carey

When?
Wednesday, February 25 2015 at 8:00PM

Download iCalendar file
(e.g. import to Outlook or Google Calendar)

Where?

1 Grange Road
Eastbourne
BN21 4EU

Who?
Nessa Carey

What's the talk about?

Modern biology is rewriting our understanding of genetics, disease and inheritance.

There are lots of situations where two things that are the same at the DNA level are different in appearance and behaviour. These tell us that there is more to life than just the genetic code, and they are known as epigenetic phenomena.

Think of a caterpillar and a butterfly, or a slipper limpet that can change its sex as an adult shellfish. Identical twins become more dissimilar as they age, despite sharing an identical DNA script. The differences can even be as extreme as one twin developing a serious disease while the other remains completely healthy.

Scientists are starting to understand how these epigenetic differences are created and maintained. The process depends on a complex set of chemicals that our cells add to our genes. These chemical changes controls how genes are expressed, so that the same genetic code can create different outcomes. They can also have unexpected effects.

For example, epigenetics is very significant to human health and disease and may have a role in a wide range of conditions from chronic diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and schizophrenia, to drug addiction and to the long term effects of abusive or neglectful childhoods. It is also known to be important in cancer.

Sometimes, epigenetic effects may even be passed on from parent to child. Children born to mothers who have lived through starvation may have increased susceptibilities to various diseases later in life. Animal studies have suggested that fear itself may be passed down to offspring.

About the speaker:

Nessa Carey has a virology PhD from the University of Edinburgh and is a former Senior Lecturer in Molecular Biology at Imperial College, London. She has worked in the biotech and pharmaceutical industry for ten years. She lives in Bedfordshire.